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18 Comments

  1. 1

    Art

    Hey scoop how come I wasn’t included?

    I’ve posted here many times and even e-mailed you at least 3 times just last year!

    If you do another one, for closers, put me on the list.

    Thanks,

    Art

  2. 2

    Wrangler

    I appreciate the effort to validate what salespeople know. We typically are only the laborers and in some cases treated as idiots or slaves in both the micro and macro worlds of TS employment. We typically have no chance of improving our status due to the lack of any controls. Success in our typical daily work lives is in my opinion only based on who is sitting in front of us that day. Our promotions are not always based on numbers or abilities either. In our TS business many more managers/executives/developers etc. in my opinion ought to treat salespeople with more positive regards and stop blaming them when things aren’t going well. We fight an uphill battle everyday. The vast negativity out there against the entire industry is what salespeople contend with each day and return the next day to do again. The emotional abuse on a TS salesperson is brutal. Even after ofensive tours in many cases we have to put up with offensive management. Our good sales numbers do not reflect the imposibilities we turn around to win. Also after 52 years as a tangible product based industry that everybody knows something about we still have to contend with outdated recission laws that allow customers to make fools of us. We sell difficult clients making lemonade from lemons to stay alive every month. And we would like to share in a residual plan from the exchange companies we make so successful and get nothing from for our future while the customers we write for them stay with them for decades without cancelling their memberships and continue their profits by paying exchange fees. We get nothing from RCI or II. It is despicable. We should have retro active residuals for the rest of our lives as long as our customers are on their books and through passed on transactions such as inheritnces or bequeaths. We get them the business and we are only paid by our next sale. This is an industry wide rant and could go on further in detail regarding the whole TS industry system as it relates to fair employment and fair contractors benefits because contractors are not anything more than employees without benefits in this industry.

  3. 3

    Anonymous

    As was pointed out in the survey most of us enjoy selling TS’s.

    And it is a great business but only for the strong; once the beat down process begins.

    A flow of tours that have no disposable income.

    Untrained or under-trained front line sales reps and T/O’s who spin to win.

    Sales managers with Napoleon complexes.

    Pay day with no paycheck forthcoming because of charge-backs and those timely payment scams.

    Weak VLO’s who blow the deal during paper work.

    As Wrangler said, not always, but often:

    The emotional abuse on a TS salesperson is brutal

  4. 4

    Cid

    If you can’t take the heat GTFO!

    1. 4.1

      Wrangler

      To Cid, emotional abuser. Most of us withstand the heat and have for many years, even decades. We don’t need to get out we need to be listened too, compensated with benefits and treated as more than slaves and given back some dignity for helping people enjoy less expensive and well maintained accomodations for vacations over many years.

  5. 5

    Rex

    Very interesting but the next time you want to do a poll just visit a TS after work hangout during Happy Hour and you’ll get the same results but a lot quicker (LMAO)!

    All kidding aside; I really liked it and answered all the questions myself and tallied up the total and my average score was 5.

  6. 6

    Anonymous

    One question you could have asked: ‘If you had it all to do over again would you have?

  7. 7

    Ted

    That is a hard question to answer Anonymous.

    I was a waiter at a high-end restaurant in the Newport, CA area before one of my regulars who’d been in the business for years talked me into coming on board.

    Overall, it’s been a great time, made some decent money, became the sales manager and then the whole deal went sideways and I found myself back on the line with another developer, at the bottom, and the process started all over again.

    Here it is many years later and had I stayed in Newport doing what I had been trained to do in the restaurant business I would have had other options that may have panned out much better for me and my family

    At the every least I would have moved up to management, had benefits, paid vacations and sick leave including unemployment issuance if I ever needed that as a backup.

  8. 8

    inittowinit

    Great questions, good to see someone take an interest in us sales reps.

    It would be interesting to see the numbers broken down by region, like sales systems can be so different in Mexico or the Caribbean than in the US the grades could be way different too. That throws the totals off I think and makes the average grade unreliable. Maybe a median grade would be better?

  9. 9

    Anonymous NR

    If sales reps don’t own the timeshare product and by the results of the survey would not sell the product to friends and family (Both Rated Lowest – 1) what does that really say about the product they are selling? It doesn’t appear that they feel they get good training, nor are supplied with good materials. I can only imagine what a sales meeting is like. (3 out of 10)
    Finally, the real surprise coming from insiders is how they feel reputation is percieved (2 out of 10 is just plain poor in anyone’s book.)

    If your only as good as your last sale and your not treated like a respected and valued employee, I think I can understand all of the above. It seems like sales people should have a base salary and benefits just like any other employee…now I only have one question…what makes you stay in an environment that has a culture like that? I’ve never seen or heard of anything like this.

  10. 10

    Chris

    What makes us stay?

    That’s simple; It’s the Casino Mentality with all the bright lights, bells and whistles.

    We just show up and it all starts anew each day.

    The ‘House’ (developers) plays the masses (ups and reps).

    The UPS come in for the free pull, a cheap order of Shrimp, a buffet or lounge show.

    The Reps come in hoping to hit the big one (earn a commission) each day.

    The buyers flip the whole tab.

    The ‘House’ rakes it (money) all in.

    It’s an addiction with a revolving front door and escalator leading up to the Casino floor and then another escalator and revolving door leading out and down to the back door for all the losers.

    It will not change; because the ‘House’ wins every time.

  11. 11

    Norma Rae

    UNION – UNION – UNION – UNION!

  12. 12

    Wrangler

    Unionising is a great idea for the able to undertake and make real.

  13. 13

    Anonymous+NR

    Chris, you make it seem like the opening from Casino with the voice over that sets the scene of what happened in Vegas during the dark days.

    In some respects, it seems fascinating and in other ways a roller coaster by your description. So…Is the disconnect in middle-management which scored lower than in senior management or do I have it the other way around?

    See, I want to form an opinion too and the comments here seem to solidify the scoring which I might have expected.

    What if I were someone who could create change…What if I were someone who needed to hear this in order to show my executive management team where we were going wrong? You see…I could be that person who is watching and learning where we need to address these problems internally and attempt to change these perceptions. I think I want to hear more…

  14. 14

    Don

    Speaking for myself and a 7 year track record; the “disconnect” is like the adage: “If the fish stinks its from the head down”.

    Thanks to an ad last year here Inside The Gate that I responded to I began a new career with an outstanding developer that has great management, pay and benefits as well as quality sales guests (and we all know how important that is).

    Before that happened I worked for some of the rotten fish of the industry and since I got out of that swamp my life and income is much better than I had ever thought possible.

    Excellent leadership is the first part of the ticket and it is that type of leadership that is lacking at most the places where many of my friends are still working.

    I’m just so fortunate to have landed with me feet squarely on the ground and will continue to look forward to an outstanding today, tomorrow and future.

    Life Is Good!

  15. 15

    Richard

    I work at a F/B track here in PV; a paradise to be sure and non-stop action.

    We’re paid 10% on all sales and if we self-gen and close the deal we get another 3 points.

    I think it should be a lot more because sales from the regular line incurs a marketing and sales cost of 53%; or so we are told.

  16. 16

    Top T/O

    It all boils down to the developer and management we work with.

    Like Don, I too work for a great developer with all the perks and yet I have friends I’ve known for many years who continue to work for the dogs of the industry.

    In many cases they’re paid less %’s, have no spiffs and no perks of any kind.

    Oh well, to each his or her own!

  17. 17

    Sammy

    The results of your poll do not surprise me at all.

    For some reason there is an avoidance to do better, improve the numbers and increase the probability that everyone including the developer wil make more money.

    Don’t understand there thought process; never did and never will!

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